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Rogers Historical Museum  

 

Special Exhibits

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The museum now charges a modest admission charge for adults (19 and older) for selected special exhibitions.

This admission charge will be waived for the following:

  • Students and active duty military personnel (with presentation of ID)

  • Teachers and chaperones accompanying school groups on tours of the special exhibition

  • Parents accompanying homeschool groups on scheduled tours of the special exhibition

  • Members of the Friends of the Museum

Regional Foodways
Thanks to an Arkansas Heritage Month Grant from the Department of Arkansas Heritage
May 3

Americans in the early 19th century prepared their meals based on what was locally available, what they had grown in their garden, or what they had preserved by home canning.  New technology and social changes brought about by the rise of commercial canning companies, such as Allen Canning, and large food processors such as Campbell’s Soup and Pillsbury; the way food was prepared changed.  It also brought about changes in diet as food from across the country was available in new markets.  Explore these topics and more with this exhibition that will be at the museum for one day only before heading to the Adult Wellness Center. 

 

 

More to See . . . More to Do: The RHM Expansion

August 25, 2012 through 2014

 

Exciting things are happening at the museum! Come see a preview of the NEW Rogers Historical Museum and learn why there will truly be “more to see and more to do” that will benefit our visitors, students, and community. Over the next few years, the museum plans to more than double in size. This planned expansion will expand gallery space from the current 2,400 square feet to 8,100 square feet. Collections storage and work areas will more than double, a new 100-seat auditorium will provide space for special programs and events, and a larger research library will be available to visitors. The new facility is envisioned as a vital member of the downtown community and an immersive, discovery experience for families as well as all visitors. This exhibit will provide a sneak peak of where the new museum will be, what it will look like, and what it will contain. Models of the interactive exhibits planned for the new facility such as a flooding river valley model to illustrate the impact of the creation of Beaver Lake, a computer-based collections kiosk to make information on important objects accessible to visitors, a kid’s play area reminiscent of a 1940s-50s kitchen, and constantly updatable information on the expansion project will demonstrate the great potential of the NEW Rogers Historical Museum.





Hog Wild: Our Area’s Love Affair with the Pig
March 22, 2014 – August 9, 2014

We’ve hunted them, raised them, eaten them, and used their images in toys, folk art, and a beloved mascot. Explore our region’s passion for the pig in an engaging exhibit featuring items ranging from farm tools to folk art and Razorback memorabilia.

 

 

 

 

What’s Cookin’
May 3 – May 31, 2014

New trends in simplified meals and expanding varieties of canned and processed meals replaced the elaborate banquets of the 1800s; and promised less time needed for food preparation.  These trends and more from the early 1900s can be discovered through a guided tour of the Hawkins House.

 

Regional Foodways
Made possible in part by a grant from the Department of Arkansas Heritage, funded by your 1/8 cent conservation tax, Amendment 75
May 3

Americans in the early 19th century prepared their meals based on what was locally available, what they had grown in their garden, or what they had preserved by home canning.  New technology allowed for flash frozen foods as well as can goods to cover long distances and arrive as fresh as when picked.  This brought about changes in the local groceries, changes in the way homemakers prepared meals at home and in people’s diets.  Regional flavors were challenged by these new ‘exotic’ foods, but it also spread southern cuisine across the country.  Many local businesses such as Pel-Freez, Allen’s Canning, Harris Baking, and Tyson to name a few made it big with these changes even though they focused on local growers. Explore these topics and more with this exhibition that will be at the museum for one day only before heading to the Adult Wellness Center. 

Exhibits Home  |  Permanent Exhibits  |  Other Local History Exhibits
Special Exhibits  |  Community Exhibits  |  Online Exhibits

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